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Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capity bri neorms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast pdict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any real authority. the vocabulary in which an
with the technology before it's as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures for software makers and whether or not they're properly in balance to make sure that they're secure with their software before they release it. but i'll let him speak for himself on that. >> host: well, mr. miller, if you would speak to that. >> guest: sure. so we're in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or apple or cisco or whoever. um, and the problem is it's very difficult to write secure code, code that's perfect with no vulnerabilities. and it's hard to measure whether a code is secure. so even an expert like myself, it's very difficult for me to tell you whether if given two programs, which one is more secure than the other. so it's hard to measure, and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. so we all want to buy the latest gadget, the latest iphone or whatever, and we don't really think to ourself how secure is it? maybe i shouldn't buy it because it's not secure. so companies, you know, they're out to
they rushed forward with the technology before it is as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures of four software makers, -- for the software makers, and whether they are properly in balance with making sure the software is secure. but i will let him speak for that. f >> mr. miller, if you would speak to that? >> sure, we are in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or cisco or whomever, and the problem is is very difficult to write secure code. whetherhard to measure code is secure, so even an expert like myself, it is difficult for me to tell you given to programs which is more secure than the other. it is hard to measure and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. we all want to buy the latest gadget, the iphone that comes out or whatever, and we don't think to ourselves, how secure is this, maybe i should not by this because it is not secure. so companies, they are out to make money and that is what they are therefore, so they want to push products out the door, beat competitors,
are not ready for that, worried about the stability of the market, the technology, giving too much power to computers and so on. it raises questions about the preparedness for disasters for the industry. what are your thoughts? >> talking to somebody doing it too long and i am too old but having said that, when there were no computers it worked pretty good. without too many failures. now over the last ten years we have more into the computer age where there is more computer trading and physical trading and we all know about the computer trading but the fact is markets should be open and they are ready to the open. it is more reassuring for everybody, this is the modus operandi. we will figure out a way to get there. i live in manhattan, we have people who work in sea port in the suburbs. they will beat their ended is business as usual. melissa: they didn't open the past two days. does that tell us something new? >> i don't know what the thought process was but wall street is in stanford, wall street is in jersey city and it is a matter of the safety of people and you don't want to defy t
to work. they also expressed concerns about this being the first time of our using our new technology. none of them had really interacted with it before. that was just too much to take. charlie: duncan, you are an amazing diplomat and smart guy, i cannot imagine you did not know that going in. my guess is this, the brokers, they operate their own dark pools which are stock exchanges, didn't they go ballistic, as we were first to report on fox business if you are open, they would have had to be open. >> i do not think that that is it, charlie. i will be honest with you guys. it was a spirited debate in a spirited discussion. i think the bottom line is what we underestimated was our goal to keep the orchid opened today, whether -- it was definitely impressed upon us that they would greatly appreciate it if we would, that they would rather not be open. charlie: to the regulators and press this upon you? >> no. as i said, it was a spirited discussion. i think it was held, you know, i did not get any sense that any time where people were trying to say we hope you guys close so we can say o
the names he still likes. all energy development comes with some risk, but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. acro america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an
for all we know. we're standing by for information on that, apple shares continuing to fall. technology as we think about it, step back and say the market peaks after qe3 is announced. leading the profits disappointments and earnings cycle that we're focusing on closely here and the nasdaq has been down five of six weeks and we're keeping an eye on the big jumps. back to you. neil: thank you, robert gray. again, that could explaining the downdraft, apple is a dominant player and when that stock tanks, no surprise that the nasdaq would be underwater. 30 minutes into the trading day and the dow and s&p and to the upside. sandra smith at the cme, sandra? >> hey, neil, i'm actually in the s&p 500 futures pit. the largest by size on the trading floor and this has been closed for physical pit trading, the past two trading sessions and we just opened here at the same time as the new york stock exchange market in chicago and we had an 8:30 central time, 9:30 a.m. eastern time open, been open about seven minutes and really conflicting news that i'm getting from traders on the open here. right on
the companies that are making technology and writing the code to shoulder the full cost, which i would argue involves creating a secure product. >> host: charlie miller what about when it comes to social media and the sharing of information that we as consumers do with google, facebook etc. etc.? does that lend itself to less secure networks? >> guest: it doesn't affect the network per se but what it does is, it puts a lot of our information and some of that prior information out there so if you never connected to the internet no one would know what you would do doing, if you are dating someone but with facebook information is there. it's still out there on a server somewhere so some back i could get to it if you wanted so i think if you consider that you know it well ago, no one would ever agree to carry around a tracking device, but now we all carry around cell phones and no one would have ever let anyone read your e-mail but right now a lot of us use e-mail and all of our e-mails are stored on it server at google so it's interesting we as a society of given our information out and whether
to take out bad cases, but they need to be hitting targets, and it's not so much the technology. >> anybody else have a question or anybody want to answer the question. >> do you think we should fighting war against the terrorist at this point or should we not, and if you do, is the way we're going about it an effective way or a way to cause -- those are the two big questions. i happen to think that if you -- what i think al-qaeda's still a problem, i grant that it is a difficult political problem for a president to say we won, and it's over. if you say it prematurely, get attacked next week, that's the end of your presidency. it's going to be over before somebody says that. >> lick benghazi. >> it happened, you know? that was local militants, not al-qaeda from above, but people, lose distinctions quickly in terms of politics, but i think there's still a reason to use them now. i don't think we're at the point yet where there's no cost. there's no reason not to use it. you want to be careful about the incentive question that you're not treating it like a hammer and everything li
kids how to write in cursive. they say technology has made the practice obsolete, so what do students think about it? >> i think they should teach it, like, because we will have a second way to write. >> you don't use it because if you order something online, if you don't need cursive. >> no word on when the final decision could be made, but banning cursive could be a thing that's happening in districts. >>> $1.84 for a gallon of gas. it is not a mistake if you see that. why one area gas station now has those low prices at the pumps but only for today. >> and we're going to take live with charlie in atlantic city right now to check out the damage there and see how close. >> traffic's really starting to pick up on 695 at old court road and we are dealing with several accidents across the region. i'll have the details coming up on good morning maryland. it's oysternomics 101. you start with a u.s. senator named ben. by helping restore thousands of acres of oyster beds, he kept hundreds of oystermen on the job... which keeps wholesalers in business... and that means more delivery compani
-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn'rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. liz: how many of you bought airborne to take because you have a coal? the company that makes it is called shift nutritional international. look at these shares. stopping move to the upside of 45%. it looks like bear health care is going to be buying it. there you go. shift network up nearly 46% at the moment. this was a $22 stock earlier todaying and now, a 33.83 stock. a big move on that one. there's a lot of commerce happening despite all the storm and the angst going on
? >> obviously we have a lot of technology here, a lot of screens, information coming in here. most important aspects is face-to-face coordination. we have police officers here we have representatives from other agencies, state, federal people will be here. ultimately depending on what happens. if the president comes to town this room is activated. so for major events we have that face-to-face immediate coordination which is very very valuable. >> now how many police officers are involved in this operation cityide? >> well, you know we have 35,000 uniform officers. ultimately most of them will be involved in some way, shape, or form. we extended our tours, we're increasing uniform patrols, officers that don't normally work in uniform are being assigned to uniform duty. so every day there are several thousand officers doing additional duty. certainly today and tomorrow. >> speaking of evacuation zones you live in an evacuation zone. you're evacuated. >> my new home right here. >> reporter: this is your new home. a good cot upstairs. >> exactly. >> reporter: thank you very mu
is up against on "cbs this morning." [ female announcer ] the next generation of investing technology is now within your grasp with the e-trade 360 investing dashboard. e-trade 360 is the world's first investing homepage that shows you where all your investments are and what they're doing with free streaming quotes, news, analysis and even your trade ticket. everything exactly the way you want it, all on one page. transform your investing with the e-trade 360 investing dashboard. when it comes to getting my family to eat breakfast i need all the help i can get. that's why i like nutella. mom, what's the capital of west virginia? charleston. nutella is a delicious hazelnut spread my whole family loves. mom, have you seen my -- backpack? nutella goes great on whole-wheat toast or whole-grain waffles. and its great taste comes from a unique combination of simple ingredients like hazelnuts, skim milk and a hint of cocoa. yeah, bye. have you seen my -- yes. and...thank you. [ male announcer ] nutella. breakfast never tasted this good. nature knows all about baking. just mix
is it to drain sea water from 20 miles of subway tunnels? put some sham wows down there. we have the technology. put some sham wows down there. we have the technology. please! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. you can see how hurricane sandy has destroyed property and lives. now being blamed for 92 deaths in the united states. >> some 3.8 million utility customers in 13 states are still without electricity. most of them in new york and new jersey. new estimate says sandy will cause $50 billion in damage to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed
, performance, technology. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ ♪ >> jennifer: from meatloaf to done at trump, quite a few people lost their minds this week, but now we turn to brett ehrlich. shhhh, brett's talking now. >> well, there are eleven days to the election and i hate to see how crazy they will be given how bonkers this week has been. donald trump offered to give $5 million to charity, if obama would turn over what he says are low college transcript rate. and now know all of the things that i thought this guy would go to jail for, it was not tax revagus. >> and here is a claimed video of president obama's birth in kenya. is that this real? it makes the president the first baby to have a birth weig
across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the next question right now. go ahead. really quick. >> i campaign all over the state. i meet with people every d
to assess the data that is coming in. >> yeah, and you see this everywhere from sports to technology, to every other field, and people often make mistakes, we aren't used to having this much information at our disposal so we tend to get enamored by all of the noise sometimes, it is easier to staley trust the one poll, because in will tell me the truth when, in reality, one poll is really noise city, and when you put them together you actually get some predictability there. >> so if my father was here listening, my late father was listening to me talk to you he would say, okay, what did you predict for the world series? >> well, i am a detroit tigers fan. >> rose: so? >> so i didn't try to make an objective prediction, sports, baseball, tigers, i allowed the bias to color my prediction. >> rose: with the bias. >> yes, yes, yes, that was disappointing, absolutely. >> rose: and four games, it must have made it worse. >> yes, they wilt add built under the pressure there, i think. >> rose: or they had good pitching on the other side. >> well, it is a well constructed team but if you look
i think with modern technology, we know about these hurricanes, four or five, six, seven days in advance, right. so there'shisbuild up, this anticipatory anxiety. it's coming in six days, five days, four days. and you get to emergency mode. now in evolution, emergency mode is a great thing. your cortisol goes up, your adrenaline goes up. if there's a tiger there a million years ago off you go and you run away and you either live or you die, right. but that whole emergency mode lasts a couple minutes. we are not used to being in emergency mode for four, five, six days. when that happens, it just don't feel good. pit of the stomach, anxiety. >> rose: what can you do about that. >> there are three things is to create panic. one of them is danger. people sense danger. two is a feeling of being trapped. and i know i had a friend of mine that day of the hurricane hit when she said boy she was okay until she heard that the subways were closed. she got a feeling in the pit of her stomach and she popped a pill to relax you and she just felt anxious. and the third thing is bad informat
was just in california and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, we don't focus on being more competitive or more grants. >> moderator: cohead 3 >> moderator: cohead >> it is due to the fact that our government hasn't been able to work together like everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things. it is equitably distributed. when i want to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reforms. and the evidence of benghazi. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question. >> i have campaigned with people all over the state. i think the best thing we can do is get government off of businesses back so that they understand that if they have a tax system that is fair and they can plan five or 10 years down the road in terms of buying equipment and hiring people, the best thing that they can do is get government out of the way to reduce relations and cut spending so that the economy can grow and people can have jobs to feed their families. >> moderator: over the p
we're getting a sneak peek in our studio. >> i kind of love this. our technology expert got her hands on the much-hyped gadget. katie, good morning. >> good morning. >> by point of reference this is a normal ipad, this is the mini and then you can compare it to the size -- that's an iphone 5. >> i just held it. i loved it. i hugged it. what is the difference, i mean, from a technological standpoint between this ipad and the mini ipad? >> it's obviously as soon as you can pick it up you can tell how light it is. in terms of features, obviously much smaller. 7.9 inches as compared to the ipad 4 which is 9.7 inches, 20% thin and 53% lighter and jam packed inside there are the features. kind of like an ipad 2 so front facing, rear facing, 5 mega pixel camera. i was impressed by the battery life, really nerdy. had ten-plus hours. a really nice feature, but in terms of everything you would expect from an ipad it's right in there. fun size. >> as i continue to play carol merrill, if you've got one of these, why do you need it? >> a one-size-fits-all. it's your choice, another option for the
inside this voter turnout operation? how do you figure out how people are using technology to get to voters? what are we missing? that will be the thing where there will be some crazy thing that comes out of the blue, all those distractions will happen. donald trump will say something. what is happening to drive to turn out and drive the outcome, i agree it is the base, it is who is more excited. now that the republicans see a potential that they can take this, they are more excited. >> one of the things we can do, and all three of us have done it, and to the extent we can, is talk to voters. i will go out the last weekend. to me, that is the point of contact. if you can get voters to talk to you about what they're thinking, if you talk to them enough, you will get a sense of what is going to happen. granted, it needs to be in an area where there is a variety of views, but you will pick up from the die-hard democrats and will come through. >> the vaunted i-4 corridor, the motorcycle bikers, people in sun city, standing in lines to see their candidate. in the end, they are speaking
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this in the coming days. >> but you say that we still depend on 20th century technology to power 21st century economy. what does that mean. >> that's referring to the electrical grid. we saw what 8 million people who lost power. we have a system that isn't ready for this kind of a disaster. you have a grid that can go down easily. even smaller events like halloween's storm last year. we have a system that's like the internet, more flexible, more resilient you can get it back online faster. >> people can tweet but still couldn't use internet or cell phones. >> exactly. the signature moment of the storm people tweeting that they had lost power which shows that very clearly. >> what are the big lessons back to the cover story, a lesson from the storm that makes a difference in terms of the future? >> a few. climate change clearly is real. scientists will differ how much climate change affect as storm like this. this will become more and more common in the future we'll have stronger storms, we'll have these coastal flooding events which are disastrous with sandy. one thing we need to deal with. secondar
20 miles of subway tunnels? you have the technology! please. >>> welcome to "cbs morning news." i'm charlie o'donnell. norah o'donnell is in washington. >>> the storm is now blamed for at least 92 deaths in the united states. >> some 3.8 million utility customers in 13 states are still without electricity. most of them in new york and new jersey. a new estimate shows sandy will cost $50 million in damage to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in history after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claimi
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

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